Archive for the ‘TV’ Category

In The Country

09Nov17

If you’re a returning visitor to this particular corner of the internet you’ll hopefully be aware that I adore Mackenzie Crook’s Detectorists. The good news is that having watched the first episode of the new (and sadly last) series my adoration remains undiminished.


In attempt to embrace the season I’ve been trawling a popular video-sharing website to view a variety of Christmas specials from yesteryear and was particularly taken with these introductory titles from 1974.


Treasure Trove

30Oct15

I was enormously pleased to hear that The Detectorists was going to make a return just after the first series finished, and the first episode of the second confirmed that I was right to be pleased. Returning in very good health it continues where it left off (albeit with the passing of a certain amount […]


Slow Motion

05May15

Given that we’re led to believe that the majority of television comes into existence through a war of attrition, it’s reassuring that programmes such as last night’s Dawn Chorus: The Sounds of Spring make it all the way through to broadcast. Shown as part of a short season of programmes praising the dawdle over the sprint, Dawn Chorus […]


Enjoy Yourself

01Jan15

If you haven’t had the opportunity to watch Marvellous, “the inspirational and incredible true story of Neil Baldwin”, I’d suggest you head over to the BBC’s iPlayer sharpish, because you’re unlikely to be anything other than delighted by it. The following exchange, that happens about two thirds of the way through the film, that sees Lou Macari […]


Prior to Mackenzie Crook’s Detectorists going out on BBC4 the National Council for Metal Detecting (no me neither) came out fighting, with the Council’s general secretary, Trevor Austin, stating that “They approached us but we didn’t want to get involved in a comedy which would belittle detecting and make detectors look anorakish.” He went on, […]


Dennis Kelly’s Utopia has returned to Channel 4 and is as entertaining and as beautifully coloured as ever. And what’s particularly nice is that this is an apparent homage to, amongst others, the work of the mighty John Hinde.